Franco-Italian Agreement 1902

Franco-Italian Agreement 1902

Relations between France and Italy concern international relations between the French Republic and the Italian Republic. Relations between France and Italy, officially the Italian Republic (since 1946), and their predecessors, the Kingdom of Sardinia (Piémont) (1814-1861) and the Kingdom of Italy (1861-1946), emphasize diplomatic, political, military, economic and cultural aspects. France played an important role in supporting Italian unification, notably through the defeat of the Austrian Empire, as well as in financial support. They were rivals for control of Tunisia and North Africa at the end of the 19th century. France won, which in 1882 prompted Italy to join the Triple Alliance with Germany and the Austro-Hungarian Empire. Tensions were high in the 1880s, which was a trade war. France needed allies against Germany, so it secretly negotiated a series of agreements and agreements with Italy that, in 1902, ensured that Italy did not support Germany in a war. When World War I broke out in 1914, Italy was initially neutral, but negotiated territorial expansion. The best offer was made by Great Britain and France, who promised Italy much of Austria and the Ottoman Empire. These two countries were among the “big four” allies; However, Italy`s discontent over the difference between the 1915 promises and the actual results of the 1919 treaty would be a powerful factor in the rise of Benito Mussolini in 1922. In the interwar period, France tried to be friends with Mussolini to avoid its support for Hitler`s Nazi Germany. This failed, and when Germany defeated France in 1940, Italy also declared war and took control of an occupied area near the common border.

Corsica was added in 1942. The two nations were part of the Six Interiors that founded the European Community, the predecessor of the European Union. They are also founding members of the G7/G8 and NATO. Since 9 April 1956, Rome and Paris have been exclusively and reciprocally linked, with the popular proverb: “We cannot accept the threat against Italian nationality in Tunis”, is the call that emanates today from Rome. The strength of the complaint is weakened by the fact that it applies not only to Tunis, but also to all of North Africa and also extends to mainland France itself.